Australian Prime Minister Sets Holiday for Queen; Says Not the Time to Discuss Republic Push

Australia will get a one-time national public holiday to mourn Queen Elizabeth II, as her death revives a decades-long debate over whether the country should become a republic. Author of the article: Bloomberg News Emma O’Brien SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – SEPTEMBER 10: An image of the late Queen Elizabeth II is projected onto the sails of…
Australian Prime Minister Sets Holiday for Queen; Says Not the Time to Discuss Republic Push

Australia will get a one-time national public holiday to mourn Queen Elizabeth II, as her death revives a decades-long debate over whether the country should become a republic.

Author of the article:

Bloomberg News

Emma O’Brien

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA – SEPTEMBER 10: An image of the late Queen Elizabeth II is projected onto the sails of the Sydney Opera House on September 10, 2022 in Sydney, Australia. Queen Elizabeth II died at Balmoral Castle in Scotland aged 96 on September 8, 2022, and is survived by her four children, Charles, Prince of Wales, Anne, Princess Royal, Andrew, Duke Of York and Edward, Duke of Wessex. Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born in Bruton Street, Mayfair, London on 21 April 1926. She married Prince Philip in 1947 and acceded the throne of the United Kingdom and Commonwealth on 6 February 1952 after the death of her Father, King George VI. Queen Elizabeth II was the United Kingdom’s longest-serving monarch. Photo by Jenny Evans /Photographer: Jenny Evans/Getty

(Bloomberg) — Australia will get a one-time national public holiday to mourn Queen Elizabeth II, as her death revives a decades-long debate over whether the country should become a republic. 

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said in an interview with the Australian Broadcasting Corp. Sunday that the holiday will take place on Thursday, Sept. 22, to coincide with a national day of memorial for the late queen, who died Sept. 8 after 70 years on the throne. Albanese and Australia’s governor-general, the sovereign’s representative in the country, will fly to London to attend her funeral next Monday, Sept. 19. 

Financial Post Top Stories

Sign up to receive the daily top stories from the Financial Post, a division of Postmedia Network Inc.

By clicking on the sign up button you consent to receive the above newsletter from Postmedia Network Inc. You may unsubscribe any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link at the bottom of our emails. Postmedia Network Inc. | 365 Bloor Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M4W 3L4 | 416-383-2300

Along with Canada, New Zealand and other former colonies of the British Empire, Australia still counts the monarch as its head of state. A referendum in 1999 to become a republic was narrowly defeated, yet the debate has simmered as Australia’s stature as a regional power and globally significant economy has grown. 

The queen’s death and King Charles III’s ascension has revived that discussion, with the leader of Australia’s Greens party, Adam Bandt, tweeting the day after her death that the country must “move forward” and become a republic. While heavily criticized by other lawmakers as insensitive, a recent poll showed about 54% of the population supported breaking from Britain. “Republic” trended on Twitter in Australia over the weekend. 

Albanese is a supporter of Australia becoming a republic, though his position has consistently been that he has no intention of holding a referendum in his first prime ministerial term. He was quick to deflect when asked about the issue on Sunday, telling the ABC’s Insiders program that “now was not a time to talk about our system of government.”

“Now is a time for us to pay tribute to the life of Queen Elizabeth, a life well lived,” he said. “A life of dedication and loyalty, including to the Australian people.” 

Former prime minister, John Howard, a monarchist who oversaw the 1999 referendum, told Insiders that Australia’s system of constitutional monarchy was valued by the people and would likely “continue in a different form” under Charles. 

Governor-General David Hurley, a former army officer, proclaimed Charles as King of Australia at an event in Canberra Sunday that featured military processions and a traditional Aboriginal smoking ceremony. 

The country’s financial markets typically close on public holidays. 

(Updates with more Albanese’s republic referendum position in fifth paragraph.)

Read More

Total
0
Shares
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Posts
Adam Posen Says Backlash to Globalization Is U.S. Economic Risk
Read More

Adam Posen Says Backlash to Globalization Is U.S. Economic Risk

Author of the article: Bloomberg News Michael P. Regan and Vildana Hajric (Bloomberg) — Terms like “globalization” and “globalists” have become dirty words to some politicians in recent years. But what is really at stake if the U.S. attempts to further isolate itself from the rest of world’s economy?  Adam Posen, president of the Peterson…
China’s Jan-Feb daily crude oil throughput falls to lowest since end-2020
Read More

China’s Jan-Feb daily crude oil throughput falls to lowest since end-2020

Author of the article: BEIJING — China’s daily oil processing rate dropped 1.1% in the first two months of 2022 from a year ago, to the lowest since December 2020, as independent refiners scaled back operations after Beijing slashed their crude oil import quotas. Throughput in the January-February period reached 113.01 million tonnes, data from…
World’s Top Economies Confront Inflation, Disease, War: Eco Week
Read More

World’s Top Economies Confront Inflation, Disease, War: Eco Week

Author of the article: Bloomberg News Craig Stirling (Bloomberg) — Group of 20 finance chiefs meeting in Indonesia will confront a much-altered global economy menaced by widespread inflation, the threat of war, and a legacy of disease.  The scope of the consumer-price shock afflicting many member countries is unprecedented since the group’s foundation at the…
BOJ notches up defense of yield cap with bigger, unscheduled bond buying
Read More

BOJ notches up defense of yield cap with bigger, unscheduled bond buying

Author of the article: TOKYO — Japan’s central bank on Wednesday ramped up efforts to defend its key yield cap, offering to buy more government bonds across the curve including through unscheduled emergency market operations. The move underscores the Bank of Japan’s resolve to keep monetary policy ultra-loose, even at the cost of fueling further…